Posts Tagged ‘distributed grid’


“Just a great video from CBS that covers the high and low end of electric cars. There’s tremendous promise that these vehicles will help us achieve (sustainable) energy independence,” sustainable products, and sustainable design, helping the environment and society at the same time. The video also presents the most challenging part of the sustainable technology.. the battery.  Originally brought to my attention by dougschi on DIGG.

read more | digg story

It is important to note that sustainable electric car technology is not imaginary: it is real, as shown in the video from CBS news. See also Phoenix electric motor cars.

Coupling electric cars with solar panels allows very green, sustainable transportation to be possible, today. However, important changes in the power grid are needed to reap the full benefits of solar panels or other types of distributed, renewable energy sources. Car batteries and individual’s solar panels can help power individual homes and the electrical grid, especially if proper credit is given for this contribution to our electrical power systems. We don’t need to wait, as a nation, to implement many of these changes, though the participation by individuals and companies will be largely dependent on financial issues, including much-needed, significant Federal tax rebates for use of renewable energy and electric cars.

© James K. Bashkin, 2008

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CTSI, the Clean Technology and Sustainable Industries Organization, is organizing CTSI Policy Day in Washington D.C. on March 5, 2008. CTSI is a non-profit organization that acts in support of sustainable technologies and “reduced footprint” technologies, including a wide range of topics.

Not every technology supported by CTSI is one that would be on my personal list of favorites. However, the CTSI platform doesn’t leave out any technologies that I place great importance on.

What is CTSI?

The Clean Technology and Sustainable Industries Organization (CTSI) is a not-for-profit membership organization with offices in Cambridge Massachusetts, San Francisco California, Detroit Michigan, Geneva Switzerland and Washington DC.

Mission Statement of CTSI:

The CTSI’s core purpose is to provide a cross industry community to promote clean technology development, profitable commercialization and global integration of sustainable industry practices, enabling the transformation of businesses, governments and society towards a more sustainable global economy. The CTSI develops programs and advocacy towards:

  • Public funded research advocacy
  • Private funded grand challenges
  • Education & media programs
  • Technology publication and dissemination
  • Industry & Policy Leadership programs
  • Community development and networking
  • IP and early stage company matching with investment & corporate partners

From the CTSI website about March 5th, 2008:

Why Should You Attend?

The voice of Clean Technology must be clearly heard in Congress. As campaign platforms are launched and appropriations are made, it is critical that our elected representatives understand the economic impact of clean & sustainable technologies and how federal policy affects your business!

Come share your stories, your needs, and give support to the clean technology policy agenda which includes:

  • Increasing funding for clean and sustainable technology applied research and deployment.
  • Providing for long-term renewable energy tax incentives and implementation policies.
  • Developing tax incentives/capital depreciation mechanisms that encourage investment in efficiency upgrades, clean technology implementations, and life-cycle product management.
  • Encouraging clean & green federal procurement policies.
  • Supporting efforts to remove barriers to public market capital.

Who Should Attend?

Congress wants to hear from the companies and organizations that are changing the energy, water, and environmental landscapes through innovative technologies, processes, or just straight-forward implementation! If you are a senior-level executive at a clean technology company, a clean or sustainable expert or director at a Fortune 1000 company, an investor or financing agent, or another member of the clean technology community that wants to have a seat at the policy table, please contact us for an invitation.
Note: There is NO CHARGE to attend this event, but SPACE IS LIMITED!

The kind of activism shown by CTSI is truly needed to make it possible for clean and sustainable technology to be taken beyond the research stage and into the market place where it can have real impact.

Conventional or traditional technologies have long benefited from Federal support for research, development and commercialization. Often this support starts with grants to academic researcher groups, and the support can progress through a variety of mechanisms, from peer-reviewed grants to both small businesses and small business/university collaborations, to government contracts and other means. While these mechanisms are available for clean technologies and are being used to support considerable research, energy policy and environmental technologies need to be considered matters of national security and treated with appropriate seriousness. Serious commitment includes significantly increased budgets, tax incentives and other support.

Germany has recently made a big push towards solar energy, for example, and this is showing returns today. The US need to follow suit, with major financing and planning by Federal and State governments. As a nation, the US wouldn’t have to borrow l;arge sums of money to pay for oil every day if we could get these new technologies up and running!

Thanks to Steve B., Sam Carana and Rich for helpful discussions and information used in this post.

© James K. Bashkin, 2008

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An environmentally friendly technology using temperature differentials in the Tropical Ocean combined with other technologies could enable global Hydrogen distribution, by Mahesh Basantani for Inhabitat.

“Ocean waves are already being used as a source of renewable energy, but could differences in water temperatures in the sea be our next source of green power? A decade old idea to generate renewable electricity for the globe with offshore, floating ‘Energy Islands’ could soon become a reality. The concept – creating artificial islands to collect wind, wave and solar power in the tropics – is based on the work of Jacques-Arsène d’Arsonval, a 19th-century French physicist, who envisioned the idea of using the sea as a giant solar-energy collector.”

read more | digg story

While considering this story, I also urge you to read Sam Carana’s articles on the distributed electrical grid, a hydrogen economy and electric cars.  He offers compelling arguments to do away with liquid fuels, coal and nuclear power as soon as possible, and to invest in solar, wind, and geothermal power industries that are supplemented by the use of biomass to generate hydrogen (the cleanest of fuels, I would say).

© James K. Bashkin, 2008

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